Film Adaptation Notes

After being asked to speak about film adaptation at the monthly Sidewalk Film Festival’s Rojo networking event for April, I decided to post notes for my talk here on the Lipidleggin.com page. You can scroll down through other posts on the blog to see the film, hear more original music from the film, read the original story, and see production stills. Please watch the film if you haven’t already; it’s only 11 minutes long, and we appreciate your interest.

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Lipidleggin’ Music by Marc Patterson

Lipidleggin’ Music by Marc Patterson   <<click here to go to the video on Vimeo

Here is the music preview with raw, uncut footage from the Sipsey River that I used in the opening titles of the film! This is just a few long, uncut shots to provide a visual for the music; it’s me composing, reframing and waiting for good fishing moments, so understand that as you watch.

ACCEPTED TO SIDEWALK FILM FESTIVAL!

I’m very glad to announce that our film “Lipidleggin’” has been accepted to the 2012 Sidewalk Film Festival! We still don’t have the schedule, but I will post more information on the screening time and venue when it’s finalized. Congratulations, everyone! And many thanks to cast, crew and supporters for making this possible. I am putting together the press kit information and getting the jury copies of the film together. I will post more information here as it is available.

Mentioned in F. Paul Wilson’s May newsletter

An early title screen grab from "Lipidleggin'"

I’m very honored that Lipidleggin’ author F. Paul Wilson mentioned this blog and our production in his May newsletter to fans. You can subscribe to his newsletter at his Repairman Jack website, named after one of his best-loved characters. We promised to keep him posted as soon as we find out whether Lipidleggin – The Film is accepted in our local film festival, and our team is planning to submit the film to other regional festivals later this summer.

Film now submitted to first festival

Hello fans of F. Paul Wilson and of our film “Lipidleggin’” based on his classic 1978 short story! I noticed in his May newsletter, Mr. Wilson mentioned our production and provided a link to this blog, and see a corresponding spike in site traffic.

By way of an update, we have finished the festival screening cut of the film and have submitted it to our first festival, the Sidewalk Moving Picture Festival in Birmingham, AL, which is where most of us live. Here’s the post for last year’s opening night film at the festival, “The Innkeepers”…I thought it was pretty cool.

2011 opening night feature film from Sidewalk Film Festival...I saw this and thought it was great, a quirky homage to 1970s ghost/horror films.

I have also screened the film for a few folks to get feedback, all of which has been positive. I think we were all just as surprised as those who have seen it at how well it’s turning out, which is a testimony to the quality of the talented folks who donated their time and skills to making the project happen. I want to personally thank each and every person involved in making “Lipidleggin’” become a reality.

The next step is, we wait. The screeners at Sidewalk have about 2-3 more weeks before they make their final selections for the festival, so we’re hoping that despite our last-minute entry, we’ve got a slot in the “Alabama Shorts” block at this year’s festival in August.

Please check out the earlier posts on this website for links to the photo album and the link to the original story in the right-hand sidebar on this page.

This is a an uncorrected screen grab from a bit of backstory cover video we shot but did not use in the final film. In the original story, Professor Gabe Varadi would rather play chess, but since it’s Gurney’s store, they play checkers…a game Gurney has more of a chance of winning. We had all-day access to the amazing Riverside Fly Shop in Jasper, Alabama, with those great knotty pine hardwood floors, walls and ceiling. There are two triangular skylights at each end of the roof, with exposed beam rafters that have a few tungsten lights for accents, and some windows and a glass door…so the whole room was fully illuminated throughout the day. We used this great “light box” construction to film without any other lighting and enjoyed the “happy accidents” of contrasting lights on actors faces and shafts of light coming through the windows at perfect moments.